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August 23, 2012

Colonial Williamsburg’s Early Music Festival Examines the Sounds of Music Heard across the 18th-century Colonial Capital of Virginia

Colonial Williamsburg’s Early Music Festival presents the sounds of the 18th century during a four-day tribute to the melodic music of colonial America that includes rare music demonstrations and special performances by guest artists dancer Paige Whitley-Bauguess and trumpet soloist Barry Bauguess among other guest artists and musicians. The festival runs Sept. 25-28 with programs in the Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg, the Governor’s Palace and the College of William and Mary’s Wren Chapel.

Early Music Festival tickets are available to participate in all the programs or by separate ticket where indicated through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office.

Events include:

Tuesday, Sept. 25

  • Music of Colonial Williamsburg: The First 50 Years, 2 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Jane Hanson, Colonial Williamsburg supervisor of music and dance, traces the first 50 years of Colonial Williamsburg’s music program. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • Music of Williamsburg, 3:15 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Experience the diversity of music found in the 18th-century colonial capital of Virginia during the screening of this 1961 film. A free reservation is required and can be made by calling 1-800-HISTORY. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket, a Revolutionary City ticket, Annual, Good Neighbor or museum pass.
  • Palace Concert: From the Collection, 7:30 p.m., Governor’s Palace Ballroom. The Governor’s Musick, Colonial Williamsburg’s resident performing ensemble, plays music using several instruments from the Foundation’s collection including an 18th-century violin, a rare 16th-century viola, an 18th-century English violoncello and a harpsichord made by English maker Jacob Kirckman in 1758. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $16 for adults and $8 for youth that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office.

    Wednesday, Sept. 26

  • “Musicks of Various and Sundrie Kinds”: The Musical Soundscape of Williamsburg in the Late 18th Century, 2 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Katherine Preston of the College of William and Mary gives an overview of music in the life of the 18th-century Williamsburg community. Music for the home, theater, church, slave quarters and workplace will be explored. In addition, guests will look inside some of the music collections owned by Williamsburg residents. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • “From Ear to Ear: Colonial Williamsburg’s Presentation of African American Music Over 30 Years,” 3:15 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Harvey Bakari, Colonial Williamsburg African American research historian, reveals the challenges of interpreting African American music in 18th-century Virginia. Discover how research and performances by adults and children contributed to the CD recording of “From Ear to Ear: The Passage of African Music through American Slavery.” Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • Music for Trumpet, Organ and Timpani, 7:30 p.m., Wren Chapel at the College of William and Mary. Barry Bauguess, festival guest artist, baroque trumpets; Tom Marshall, William and Mary faculty, organ; and Lance Pedigo, drum major, Colonial Williamsburg, timpani; present a concert of stirring music from the courts, chapels and concert halls of the 17th and 18th centuries. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $18 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office.

    Thursday, Sept. 27

  • Early Drum Tablature, 2 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. John Moon, former Colonial Williamsburg director of music and former senior drum major of the Brigade of Guards and of the British Army, gives this presentation on the history of drumming notation and how various examples can be interpreted. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • The Art of Military Music, 3:15 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Barry Bauguess, baroque trumpets; Lance Pedigo, percussion; and Timothy Sutphin, Colonial Williamsburg director of music, military and evening programs, fife; present musical examples of the military’s use of music in the 17th and 18th centuries. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • Evening at the Theater: The Walking Statue, 7:30 p.m., Kimball Theatre. This special performance of the current play in Colonial Williamsburg’s historic play series features the entertainments that 18th-century playgoers experienced at the theater, including “first music” before the play begins and beautiful entr’actes of dance between the scenes performed by Early Music Festival guest artist Paige Whitley-Bauguess. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $16 for adults and $8 for youth that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office.

    Friday, Sept. 28

  • Dance in London: English Contributions to the Art Form, 2 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Paige Whitley-Bauguess presents a lecture and demonstration highlighting English dancing in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Enjoy a demonstration of dances and characters associated with Hester Santlow, along with a brief introduction to a specifically English dance type, the hornpipe. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • Pleasures of the Dance, 3:15 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Colonial Williamsburg dance instructor Marcy Wright has taught thousands of Foundation guests basic steps of colonial English country dancing at this popular year-round program. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $10 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office. William and Mary students are free with the presentation of a Colonial Williamsburg Collegiate Pass.
  • Palace Concert: The Trumpet shall Sound, 7:30 p.m., Governor’s Palace. An evening of music to conclude the Early Music Festival with Colonial Williamsburg’s resident performing ensemble, The Governor’s Musick, and featuring festival guest artist Barry Bauguess, baroque trumpet. A reception with the artists will follow in the Governor’s Palace East Advance building. Admission is through an Early Music Festival ticket or a separate ticket of $25 that can be purchased through 1-800-HISTORY or any Colonial Williamsburg ticket office.

    Registration for the four-day conference is $175 per person and includes all programs listed, a closing reception and a ticket to the Revolutionary City good through Sunday, Sept. 30. Program attendees may register for two optional tours ¬ A Special Look at the Colonial Williamsburg Collection of 18th-century Music and the Conservation Lab Tour.

    Register for the conference online at www.history.org/conted or call 1-800-603-0948, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

    Conference registration is from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum.

    Programs and exhibitions at The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum are supported by the DeWitt Wallace Endowment Fund.

    Colonial Williamsburg’s music programs are funded in part by the Marianne and Randall Tobias Music Endowment Program and the Lynne R. Murphy Memorial Endowment Fund.

    The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is the not-for-profit educational and cultural organization dedicated to the preservation, interpretation and presentation of the restored 18th-century Revolutionary capital of Virginia. This town-sized living history museum tells the inspirational stories of our journey to become Americans through programs in The Revolutionary City and through the award-winning Revolutionary CityTM presentation. Explore The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg and discover the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum featuring the best in British and American decorative arts from 1670 – 1830 and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum home to the nation’s premier collection of American folk art, comprising more than 5,000 folk art objects made during the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Colonial Williamsburg Hotels feature conference spaces and recreation activities from spa and fine dining to world-class golf. Colonial Williamsburg is committed to expanding its thought-provoking programming through education outreach on-site and online. Purchase of Colonial Williamsburg products and services supports the preservation, research and educational programs of the Foundation. Philanthropic support by individuals, corporations, and foundations benefits the educational mission of The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

    liamsburg is located in Virginia’s Tidewater region, 20 minutes from Newport News, within an hour’s drive of Richmond and Norfolk, and 150 miles south of Washington, D.C. For more information about Colonial Williamsburg, call 1-800-HISTORY or visit Colonial Williamsburg’s website at www.history.org.

    Media Contact:
    Penna Rogers
    (757) 220-7121



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