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February 28, 2003

Colonial Williamsburg Celebrates "The Best of Women's History" March 28-30

Colonial Williamsburg invites guests to the restored 18th-century capital of Virginia in March for a special celebration of Women’s History Month. Women’s History Month comes to a close at Colonial Williamsburg March 28-30 with “The Best of Women’s History: A Celebration.” The weekend’s events encourage guests to explore the lives of women over four centuries, the roles they played and how they responded to the events surrounding their lives.

Friday, March 28

  • “Focus on the Ladies at the Governor’s Palace,” 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Governor’s Palace. During a 25-minute tour, guests learn about the ladies who called the Palace home. Reservations are required.
  • “The Geddy Women,” 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Geddy House. During 20- to 25-minute tours of the Geddy House, guests explore the various roles of women as wife, mother, daughter, mistress of the household and the pursuits that encompassed and defined their daily lives.
  • “Language of Clothing,” 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum. Museum staff and volunteers take guests on a themed tour of this new wide-ranging exhibit. From court gowns to slave clothes, the apparel women wore helped to define their roles in society.
  • “Soul of a Sharecropper,” 1:30-2:30 p.m., behind the Robert Carter House. Meet a former slave woman and hear the tale of her life’s struggles.
  • “Women of the Restoration,” 3-4 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. In this lecture and panel discussion, guests have an opportunity to learn about the women who played a vital role in the start of Colonial Williamsburg. Reservations are required.
  • “Women of Williamsburg,” 3:30-4:30, Greenhow Lumber House. On this Historic Area walking tour, guests come to understand the trials and triumphs that women experienced as they lived their lives in a time of challenge and change. Reservations are required.
  • “Tryin’ to Git Some Mother Wit,” 8:30-9:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. This stage presentation offers an intimate look at the lives of African-American women as they confront the issues of separation from family, raising their children and living in a world where they have little control over their own future. Contains mature subject matter. Reservations and a separate ticket are required.

    Saturday, March 29

  • “Focus on the Ladies at the Governor’s Palace,” 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
  • “The Geddy Women,” 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Geddy House.
  • “Betty Randolph’s Revolutionary World,” 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Peyton Randolph House. During 25- to 30-minute tours, guests learn about the role of Betty Randolph, the wife of one of the colony’s most influential political leaders.
  • “Language of Clothing,” 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum.
  • “Meet Martha Washington,” 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Mary Stith House. Mrs. Washington is eager to share her personal journey through life as wife of a Burgess (and future president) from one of the Virginia colony’s prosperous counties.
  • “Wanted: Apprentice for the Milliner,” 1, 1:20, 1:40 and 2 p.m., Millinery Shop. In this delightful interactive experience, children and their elders are invited to consider what skills a young person needed to become a milliner.
  • “Four Centuries of Williamsburg Women,” 1:30-2:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. In this innovatively staged presentation, the lives and fashions of several women spanning the centuries are heard and shown. Reservations are required.
  • “Women of Williamsburg,” 3:30 p.m., Greenhow Lumber House. Reservations are required.
  • “Making Do on the Homefront,” 8:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. In this hour-and-a-half original play, four different women speak of the hardships that they endure as the protests and conflicts that lead to the American Revolution roar around them.

    Sunday, March 30

  • “Focus on the Ladies at the Governor’s Palace,” 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
  • “The Geddy Women,” 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Geddy House.
  • “Language of Clothing,” 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum.
  • “Betty Randolph’s Revolutionary World,” 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Peyton Randolph House.
  • “Mrs. Powell and Kate—Mistress and Slave,” 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Benjamin Powell House. Learn how Mrs. Powell, as mistress of her household, depends on the work and cooperation of her domestic slave, Kate, to keep her home in good order. Kate has learned that though she must follow her mistresses instructions there are ways, however subtle, to gain at least some of her own desires.
  • “A Conversation with Martha Washington,” 2 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. Mary Wiseman, who portrays Martha Washington, discusses the process that goes in to creating “People of the Past.” Reservations are required.
  • “Women of Williamsburg,” 3:30-4:30, Greenhow Lumber House. Reservations are required.

    A Colonial Williamsburg admission ticket is required to attend all of these programs. Reservations or special tickets are needed where indicated.

    Editor’s Note: Slides and visuals are available upon request.

    A Women’s History Hotel package is an excellent value and the best way to enjoy this weekend. The package includes two nights’ accommodations at a Colonial Williamsburg hotel. Participants in the special Colonial Williamsburg hotel package can enjoy the following programs exclusively for them:

    Friday, March 28

  • Reception with character interpreters and presenters, 5 p.m., Historic Area tavern.
  • Dinner, 5:30 p.m., Historic Area tavern.
  • “Tryin’ to Git Some Mother Wit,” 8:30-9:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium.

    Saturday, March 29

  • “Women in Trades: A Modern Conversation,” 9:30 a.m., Woodlands Conference Center. This panel discussion offers a unique opportunity to hear some of the real life stories from the women themselves as they describe their work and experiences in Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Trades.
  • “Tea and Conversation,” Williamsburg Inn East Lounge, 3 p.m. Lady Dunmore, Mrs. Randolph and their daughters host the ladies for tea.
  • Dinner, 6 p.m., Historic Area tavern.
  • “Making Do on the Homefront,” 8:30 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium.

    Sunday, March 30

  • On your own.

    Prices for this hotel package start at $255 per person for the Woodlands Hotel & Suites, $315 for the Williamsburg Lodge, $335 for Colonial Houses, $410 for Providence Hall and $520 for the Williamsburg Inn and are based on double occupancy and vary with room type. A Colonial Williamsburg admission ticket is included. Taxes are not included.

    Known worldwide as the nation’s largest living history museum, Colonial Williamsburg’s mission is “that the future may learn from the past.” Colonial Williamsburg is located 150 miles south of Washington, D.C., off Interstate 64. For more information, call toll-free (800) HISTORY or visit Colonial Williamsburg’s web site at www.colonialwilliamsburg.org.

    Media Contact:
    Penna Rogers
    (757) 220-7121



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