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October 7, 2005

CW will present "Friends and Brethren: The Cherokee in Williamsburg"

Eighteenth-century Williamsburg was a vibrant diverse town populated with Europeans, free and enslaved blacks, and American Indians. As the hub of Virginia politics in the 18th-century, Williamsburg was often host to several delegations from various Indian tribes. The most frequent visitors were from the Cherokee who came to seek council with Virginia leaders. These “Friends and Brethren,” as the Governor’s Council addressed them, came to discuss trade, alliances and peace.

On Oct. 29-30 a Cherokee delegation again will return to Williamsburg.

Saturday, Oct. 29

  • Playbooth Theatre, noon – 1 p.m., 3-4 p.m. Lloyd Arneach and Driver Pheasant, members of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation, will tell stories of the Cherokee people.
  • “I Give You the Belt of Wampum,” 2-2:30 p.m. Capitol Building South Gate. In 1755 a delegation of Cherokee met with the Governor and Council to discuss alliances during the French and Indian War. At the conclusion of the Cherokee’s speech, the delegation presented the Governor with a belt of wampum – small white and purple shells -- to confirm what they had spoken. Join in as members of the Eastern Cherokee Nation and Colonial Williamsburg character interpreters re-create this historic encounter.

    Sunday, Oct. 30

  • Playbooth Theatre 10-11 a.m., noon-1 p.m. Lloyd Arneach and Driver Pheasant, members of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation, will tell stories of the Cherokee people.
  • “They Favored the Public with Dance” 2-3 p.m. Palace Green. In 1777 Governor Patrick Henry received the last Cherokee delegation to visit Williamsburg. After their council, the Cherokee danced on Palace Green. Join us as members of the Eastern Cherokee Dancers re-create traditional dances on Palace Green.

    This American Indian Initiative program is made possible by the generous support of Carole Davis Crocker.

    Media Contact:
    Lorraine C. Brooks
    (757) 220-7280



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