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February 3, 2006

February and March programs at CW's DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum entice the senses

The DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum has announced its programs for February and March. These programs focus on period music, new historical books and even the color purple, all programs pleasing to the eyes and ears. Programs are included in museum admission unless otherwise noted.

Saturday, February 11

  • The Roots and Branches of American Music, 3 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. Folk musician Bob Zentz explores the origins of American songs and instruments in a concert that is fun for the whole family. Included in museum admission, but requires a free reservation available at any Colonial Williamsburg ticket location.

    Sunday, February 12

  • Irish Music for a Winter’s Day, 3 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. Join Dan and Stuart Jackson, a father-and-son duo, with Graham DeZarn as they perform traditional Irish music. Included in museum admission, but requires a free reservation available at any Colonial Williamsburg ticket location.

    Saturday, February 25

  • Purple Reign, 3 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. Deborah Kraak, a free-lance historian who specializes in textiles, costumes and period interiors, looks at the history of the color purple on the 150th anniversary of William Perkin’s creation of mauvine, the first synthetic dye.

    Friday, March 3

  • Jamestown and the Birth of America, 5 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. James Horn, Abby and George O’Neill Director of the Foundation’s John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library, will discuss his new book, “A Land as God Made It”, which examines the founding of Jamestown, the first English settlement in the New World. Preceding Plymouth by 13 years, Jamestown brought together Native Americans, Europeans and Africans that came together to shape this new world.

    Sunday, March 5

  • Ben Franklin Book for Recipes, 3 p.m., DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum’s Hennage Auditorium. A discussion of Hilaire Dubourcq’s book, “Ben Franklin Book of Recipes,” which is a book that examines the life of Benjamin Franklin and 18th-century cooking. Hilaire states that what inspired him to write this book was the Benjamin Franklin House in London, which “is where the embryo developed into the Birth of a Great Nation,” according to Dubourcq.

    The Wallace Museum, Abby Aldrich Folk Art Museum and Public Hospital will be closed from March 6 through mid-May/early June 2006 for maintenance work. As soon as that work is completed, a portion of the museum will re-open and feature masterworks from the decorative art collections. Much of museum programming, especially that geared toward our younger guests, will continue but may be relocated to other sites around the Foundation. Colonial Williamsburg’s goal is to have these museum facilities fully operational around the beginning of 2007. The latest information about the re-opening dates and museum programming can be found on Colonial Williamsburg’s website at http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.org/history/museums/.

    The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s award-winning DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum, supported by the DeWitt Wallace Endowment Fund, displays the Foundation’s exceptional collection of British and American decorative arts. Entered through the reconstructed Public Hospital of 1773, the museum is on Francis Street near Merchants Square and is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is included in any multi-day Colonial Williamsburg admission ticket or separate museums ticket. For program information, call (757) 220-7724.

    Media Contact:
    Penna Rogers
    (757) 220-7121



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