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Objectives

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAM:

Elementary school sessions focus on the colonial and the early national period, exploring content from 1607 through the end of the Revolutionary War. During the week, teachers will:

  • Identify and analyze significant seventeenth- and eighteenth-century economic, political, and social events that led to American independence from Great Britain.
  • Chart the evolution of citizenship from being British subjects to becoming American citizens from colonization to the present day.
  • Explain how Native American, European, and African interactions shaped and defined the American character.
  • Examine the experiences of various social levels, such as gentry, middling, free blacks, lesser sort, enslaved, and special populations, such as women and Native Americans, in 18th-century Virginia.
  • Integrate primary sources, secondary sources, and technological resources in classroom instruction focused on early American history and citizenship.
  • Create opportunities for continued professional development in social studies education with fellow teachers and Colonial Williamsburg educators.

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM:

Middle school sessions focus on the emerging American identity from 1606 to 1865. During the week, teachers will:

  • Identify and analyze four pairs of seemingly contradictory American values that, while in tension, influence the course of American history.
  • Chart the evolution of citizenship and American identity from the American Revolution through the U.S. Civil War and make connections to present-day America.
  • Evaluate the way historical events from 1606 to 1865 have impacted American identity.
  • Apply instructional strategies that encourage civil discourse from multiple perspectives using primary and secondary sources.
  • Create opportunities for continued professional development in social studies education with fellow teachers and Colonial Williamsburg educators.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM:

High school sessions use a thematic approach to American history in which teachers explore content from 1606 through 1970 and examine how issues in American history have been under constant debate. During the week, teachers will:

  • Identify and analyze four pairs of seemingly contradictory American values that, while in tension, influence the course of American history.
  • Evaluate historical events, documents, and figures from 1606 to 1970 through the thematic lens of protest and reform in the United States.
  • Interpret the ways each generation influences the expectations of citizenship from the founding of America through the present day.
  • Apply instructional strategies that encourage civil discourse from multiple perspectives using primary and secondary sources.
  • Create opportunities for continued professional development in social studies education with fellow teachers and Colonial Williamsburg educators.

INSTITUTE IN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CONTENT LITERACY

The  Institute in American History and Content Literacy will focus on the colonial period, exploring content from 1750 until the end of the Revolutionary War. During the week, teachers will:

  • Investigate the daily lifestyles of various social levels in eighteenth-century America, including the gentry, middling sort, tradespeople, merchants, soldiers, women, and slaves.
  • Explore European and African interactions including folklore, ideas, and other cultural contributions that helped to shape and defined the American character.
  • Interpret primary sources to explore daily life in colonial Virginia including social/cultural, political, economic, scientific/technological, or religious.
  • Identify and analyze significant eighteenth-century economic, political, and social events that led to American independence from Great Britain.
  • Learn and review how to develop students' abilities to use higher level critical thinking skills through the use of primary sources and technological resources.
  • Practice and draft lessons focused on nonfiction reading and writing skills, note-taking, writing to learn, writing to teach others, and for public speaking and debate.
  • Draft, revise, edit, and publish demonstration texts aimed at supporting students’ informational writing skills.


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